Burbank Depends On Imported Water That Travels Hundreds Of Miles To Get To Our Community

Did you know that Burbank is 100% dependent on imported water purchased from the Metropolitan Water District (MWD)? Even the rainwater that makes its way into the underground aquifers beneath our city does not belong to us. Water travels hundreds of miles to get to Burbank, using electricity to move heavy water to Burbank. On top of that, MWD can restrict how much water member agencies like BWP can get when supplies are limited. The graphic below explains where we get our water from and how it gets to you.

Burbank Depends On Imported Water That Travels Hundreds Of Miles To Get To Our Community

Did you know that Burbank is 100% dependent on imported water purchased from the Metropolitan Water District (MWD)? Even the rainwater that makes its way into the underground aquifers beneath our city does not belong to us. Water travels hundreds of miles to get to Burbank, using electricity to move heavy water to Burbank. On top of that, MWD can restrict how much water member agencies like BWP can get when supplies are limited. The graphic below explains where we get our water from and how it gets to you.

Hover over the numbers to learn about the 300 mile water journey.

STEP 1

State Water Project & Colorado River Aqueduct untreated water from the Colorado River and the Northern Sierras enters the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) system. This year, because of the drought, BWP is not getting water from the State Water Project.

STEP 2

Metropolitan Water District MWD is a regional water wholesaler that manages and distributes water to California utilities.

STEP 3

Spreading Grounds & Aquifer The City of Burbank does not have rights to rainwater that recharges the aquifers. BWP buys untreated water from the State Water Project through MWD and stores it in the local aquifers as "credits."

STEP 4

Water is pumped from the aquifer and directed to the Burbank Operable Unit (BOU) by pipeline. Burbank accesses this untreated water with the credits they earned by buying water from the MWD, making it less expensive than the treated water (#5).

STEP 5

Treated MWD Water is sold to Burbank for immediate use. This water, about 18% of Burbank’s supply, is more expensive than groundwater from the aquifer.

STEP 6

BOU The Burbank Operable Unit cleans the water that comes from the aquifer. The Blending Plant mixes water from #4 and #5 and sends it to the public for consumption.

STEP 7

Through an innovative arrangement between BWP and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), BWP filters LADWP's ground water at the BOU. This cleans up the aquifer faster and allows BWP to produce drinking water for Burbank at a lower price.

STEP 8

BWP Burbank distributes the water from the Blending Plant to your home. Wastewater from your home, coming from such uses as showering or washing clothes, is the source of what becomesrecycled water in #9.

STEP 9

Recycled Water Using recycled water for irrigation helps keep your water prices low. Over 160 sites in Burbank have been converted to use recycled water.

STEP 10

Irrigation water seeps back into the aquifer creating more groundwater “credits” for Burbank.

YOUR WATER TAKES AN EXTRAORDINARY JOURNEY TO GET TO YOUR TUB OR FAUCET. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA IS 100% DEPENDENT ON OUTSIDE SOURCES FOR ITS WATER.

How to Contact Us

Customer Service: (818) 238-3700

Water Services: (818) 238-3500

Electric Services: (818) 238-3575

Conservation Services: (818) 238-3730

Street Light Outages: (818) 238-3700

After-Hours Emergency: (818) 238-3778

ONEBurbank: (818) 238-3113

Currents Editors

Editor-in-Chief

JEANNINE EDWARDS jjedwards@burbankca.gov

Editor

Creative Director

TRACIE NEISWONGER tneiswonger@burbankca.gov

EV Expert