THE “HARD” FACTS ABOUT BURBANK’S WATER

As the weather turns warmer, the number of customer questions about the taste of their water typically rises.

BWP’s water meets all state and federal water-quality standards and sometimes exceeds them. We follow scientifically based safety standards to ensure that your drinking water is safe. Over 25,000 water quality tests are conducted annually to check for 160 different chemicals and contaminants to ensure that Burbank’s water is safe to drink.

That said, Burbank’s water is “hard” because of naturally occurring calcium and magnesium deposits in the ground that are dissolved as water moves through soil and rock. Hard water isn’t a health hazard, but it could contribute to changes in the taste of water at different times of the year.

If taste is an issue for you, we recommend purchasing a water-filtration pitcher to soften the water and reduce any chlorine taste.

BWP’s water meets and sometimes exceeds all state and federal water-quality standards.

Depending on where you live in Burbank, tap water during the summer may have a different taste compared to your water in the winter. There can be several reasons for that:

ALGAE IN ABOVE GROUND STORAGE

During the warm summer months, our above-ground water storage reservoirs experience an increase in the growth of algae, which has to be removed by chlorine. Some people may be more sensitive to the taste from chlorine in these summer months.

COLORADO RIVER AQUEDUCT

We are 100% dependent on imported sources of water supplied by the Metropolitan Water District. Even rainfall, when it happens, does not belong to Burbank. Our water comes from Northern California, via the State Water Project, from Colorado via the Colorado River Aqueduct, and is stored in the underground aquifers beneath Burbank. Each of those water sources has a unique combination of flavor characteristics. Because of the drought, Burbank is not taking any water from the State Water Project this year.

CAPTURE STAGNANT WATER FOR YOUR PLANTS

If you live in an apartment over a business that has been closed, and your plumbing is connected to the business’ system, some water may become stagnant from sitting in the pipes due to the business’ closure. If you run your tap for a few minutes (catch the unused water in a bucket to water plants!), that should get the stagnant water out of the system and bring in fresh water.

CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

Finally, the chemical composition of soil during a drought is different from what it is during a wet year. As we enter our third year of drought, that could affect the flavor characteristics of our tap water.

How to Contact Us

Customer Service: (818) 238-3700

Water Services: (818) 238-3500

Electric Services: (818) 238-3575

Conservation Services: (818) 238-3730

Street Light Outages: (818) 238-3700

After-Hours Emergency: (818) 238-3778

ONEBurbank: (818) 238-3113

Currents Editors

Editor-in-Chief

JEANNINE EDWARDS jjedwards@burbankca.gov

Editor

Creative Director

TRACIE NEISWONGER tneiswonger@burbankca.gov

EV Expert