2021 ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT

Burbank Water and Power provides water service for the citizens of Burbank. BWP is proud of our ongoing record of delivering high quality water to Burbank’s residents and businesses for over 100 years. Burbank’s water not only meets but surpasses all state and federal drinking water standards.

This report shares the results of thousands of sample tests being analyzed for over 162 elements that may be found in drinking water. One important section of this report includes educational information and precautions for people with health issues that require them to avoid certain constituents and/or contaminants.

If you have any questions about this report, please call Tony Umphenour at (818) 238-3500. For information on BWP’s water conservation programs, please visit us at BurbankWaterAndPower.com. You can also attend BWP Board meetings held at 164 W. Magnolia Blvd. on the first Thursday of each month at 5:00 p.m.

GROUND WATER TREATMENT

BWP buys untreated water from MWD. The water comes from the San Francisco Bay Delta and the Colorado River. We spread the water on the ground (at the Pacoima and Lopez spreading grounds), where it percolates into the San Fernando Ground Water Basin. However, portions of the groundwater basin are contaminated from activities related to the former Lockheed Corporation’s aircraft manufacturing plant in Burbank. The EPA designated the basin as a Superfund site in 1986 and ordered Lockheed to construct the Burbank Operable Unit treatment plant (BOU). BWP runs the BOU, which became operational in 1996.

When we need the groundwater, we pump it out of the ground and treat it at the BOU. It is a facility that is highly regulated by the EPA, and we work closely with them, the State’s Division of Drinking Water, and Lockheed- Martin, to ensure that the BOU cleans up the groundwater basin and provides drinking water that meets or exceeds all mandated drinking water standards.

View the groundwater report at BWP-Currents.com/water-reports

EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, that can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides that may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals that are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. State Board regulations also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that provide the same protection for public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or visiting their website at epa.gov/safewater.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. USEPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Nitrate: Nitrate (as nitrogen) in drinking water at levels above 10 mg/L is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. Such nitrate levels in drinking water can interfere with the capacity of the infant’s blood to carry oxygen, resulting in a serious illness; symptoms include shortness of breath and blueness of the skin. Nitrate levels above 10 mg/L may also affect the ability of the blood to carry oxygen in other individuals, such as pregnant women and those with certain specific enzyme deficiencies. If you are caring for an infant, or you are pregnant, you should ask advice from your health care provider.

Lead: If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. BWP is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in private plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before drinking. You may wish to collect the flushed water and reuse it for another beneficial purpose, such as watering plants. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at epa.gov/safewater/lead or at BWP’s website BurbankWaterandPower.com

The following definitions may be helpful in your understanding of our Water Quality Report:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs (or MCLGs) as is economically and technologically feasible. Secondary MCLs are set to protect the odor, taste, and appearance of drinking water.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs are set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Public Health Goal (PHG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. PHGs are set by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Primary Drinking Water Standard (PDWS): MCLs and MRDLs for contaminants that affect health along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment requirements.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Regulatory Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

This Water Quality Report reflects changes in drinking water regulatory requirements during 2020. All water systems are required to comply with the state Total Coliform Rule. Beginning April 1, 2016, all water systems are also required to comply with the federal Revised Total Coliform Rule. The new federal rule maintains the purpose to protect public health by ensuring the integrity of the drinking water distribution system and monitoring for the presence of microbials (i.e., total coliform and E. coli bacteria). The U.S. EPA anticipates greater public health protection as the new rule requires water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems. Water systems that exceed a specified frequency of total coliform occurrences are required to conduct an assessment to determine if any sanitary defects exist. If found, these must be corrected by the water system.

IMPORTANT LINKS

State Water Resources Control Board, Division of Drinking Water waterboards.ca.gov California EPA calepa.ca.gov EPA (Groundwater and Drinking Water) epa.gov/safewater

How to Contact Us

Customer Service: (818) 238-3700

Water Services: (818) 238-3500

Electric Services: (818) 238-3575

Conservation Services: (818) 238-3730

Street Light Outages: (818) 238-3700

After-Hours Emergency: (818) 238-3778

ONEBurbank: (818) 238-3113

Currents Editors

Editor-in-Chief

JEANNINE EDWARDS jjedwards@burbankca.gov

Editor

Creative Director

TRACIE NEISWONGER tneiswonger@burbankca.gov

EV Expert