Great Start on Drought Response!

Let’s Keep it Up!

Burbank residents and businesses did a great job on water conservation in December and January, cutting water use so the city met Governor Gavin Newsom’s voluntary request to use 15% less water.

But we can’t get too comfortable: we used too much water in February and March and exceeded our water use goal, according to BWP’s water experts.

And while the late-March rains help, we are nowhere near the end of the drought. On March 28, after the driest first three months of a year in the state’s recorded history, Gov. Gavin Newsom issued an executive order for water suppliers to activate more stringent drought contingency plans. As a precaution, Burbank invoked water conservation measures last fall. However, even stricter measures may be needed.

BWP thanks all the residents and businesses that reduced their water use in response to the drought. Reduced watering of lawns and corporate campuses was the biggest contributor to the water savings.

Richard Wilson, BWP’s Assistant General Manager for Water, said, “We really appreciate our customers’ water-reduction efforts. We want you to know that BWP is working right alongside you to reduce its water use.”

Great Start on Drought Response!

Let’s Keep it Up!

Burbank residents and businesses did a great job on water conservation in December and January, cutting water use so the city met Governor Gavin Newsom’s voluntary request to use 15% less water.

But we can’t get too comfortable: we used too much water in February and March and exceeded our water use goal, according to BWP’s water experts.

And while the late-March rains help, we are nowhere near the end of the drought. On March 28, after the driest first three months of a year in the state’s recorded history, Gov. Gavin Newsom issued an executive order for water suppliers to activate more stringent drought contingency plans. As a precaution, Burbank invoked water conservation measures last fall. However, even stricter measures may be needed.

BWP thanks all the residents and businesses that reduced their water use in response to the drought. Reduced watering of lawns and corporate campuses was the biggest contributor to the water savings.

Richard Wilson, BWP’s Assistant General Manager for Water, said, “We really appreciate our customers’ water-reduction efforts. We want you to know that BWP is working right alongside you to reduce its water use.”

LESS WATER = LESS HYDROELECTRICITY, GREATER RISK OF WILDFIRES

California is in the third year of a historic drought, which is pushing all of us to do more when it comes to using water wisely.

The winter snow season started off well in December, but there has been virtually no new snow or rain since late December. Water reservoirs around the state and the West generally have fallen to extremely low levels. Lake Oroville, from which Burbank gets some of its water, is about 50% full. Last year, water levels there were so low that electricity could not be generated by the lake’s hydroelectric generators.

Other major reservoirs in the West that supply Burbank with water or power, including Lake Mead and Lake Powell, also have fallen so low that they, too, have had to stop generating electricity. Lake Powell is about 25% full. Lake Mead is about 33% full and stands at the lowest water level since it was built nearly nine decades ago.

This illustrates the so-called “water-power nexus” in the West, where hydroelectric generators produce power for the region. When lake levels fall, there is less water and electricity to go around.

And a warmer, drier climate increases the danger of wildfires in California and across the region. Water conservation in our community will help ensure that there will be enough water to fight wildfires.

BURBANK’S OUTDOOR WATERING SCHEDULE

Burbank is currently in Stage II of the Sustainable Water Use Ordinance, which reduces outdoor watering to three days per week, on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, from April to October. The move to Stage II was in response to the governor’s call last July for a voluntary 15% reduction in water use from 2020 levels. The state could add further limitations on outdoor watering if Burbank does not meet its 15% reduction target.

“We really appreciate our customers’ water-reduction efforts.” RICHARD WILSON, BWP’S ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER FOR WATER

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP SAVE WATER

In addition to following Burbank’s outdoor watering schedule, there are a variety of rebates and programs available to help you save water. Last year, BWP increased the value of rebates for installing water-efficient equipment. For example:

And we continue to offer rebates to residential customers who want to change out their thirsty lawns for drought-tolerant plants. We encourage customers to visit our website to participate in our water-saving programs and to find information on how you can save water.

IF WE’RE IN A DROUGHT, WHY IS DEVELOPMENT CONTINUING?

Some residents have asked how Burbank is able to build new homes if there is less water available due to the drought.

Burbank is in a housing shortage. About 100,000 workers commute to Burbank from other cities each day on buses, cars, and trains. Many of those workers would move to Burbank if housing were available. More homes are being built to alleviate that so that more people who work here can also live here.

Every five years, Burbank and the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) submit to the state our Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP), which analyzes projected water demand and additional water supplies for the next 20 years under various conditions, including multiyear droughts. For the most recent plan, for the years 2025–2045, BWP includes all of the city’s housing units projected by the Community Development Department.

This plan also assessed how new housing, especially apartments and condominiums, will utilize more water-efficient appliances that meet the latest building efficiency codes.

You can learn more about the UWMP at BWP-Currents.com/urban-water-management-plan.

IF WE’RE IN A DROUGHT, WHY IS DEVELOPMENT CONTINUING?

Some residents have asked how Burbank is able to build new homes if there is less water available due to the drought.

Burbank is in a housing shortage. About 100,000 workers commute to Burbank from other cities each day on buses, cars, and trains. Many of those workers would move to Burbank if housing were available. More homes are being built to alleviate that so that more people who work here can also live here.

Every five years, Burbank and the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) submit to the state our Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP), which analyzes projected water demand and additional water supplies for the next 20 years under various conditions, including multiyear droughts. For the most recent plan, for the years 2025–2045, BWP includes all of the city’s housing units projected by the Community Development Department.

This plan also assessed how new housing, especially apartments and condominiums, will utilize more water-efficient appliances that meet the latest building efficiency codes.

You can learn more about the UWMP at BWP-Currents.com/urban-water-management-plan.

How to Contact Us

Customer Service: (818) 238-3700

Water Services: (818) 238-3500

Electric Services: (818) 238-3575

Conservation Services: (818) 238-3730

Street Light Outages: (818) 238-3700

After-Hours Emergency: (818) 238-3778

ONEBurbank: (818) 238-3113

Currents Editors

Editor-in-Chief

JEANNINE EDWARDS jjedwards@burbankca.gov

Editor

Creative Director

TRACIE NEISWONGER tneiswonger@burbankca.gov

EV Expert